Wild Atlantic Way

7 Places To Visit Along The Wild Atlantic Way

The Wild Atlantic Way stretches for 2,500 km and boasts breathtaking views of the Atlantic coast; get ready to have your minds blown at every turn. It is home to nine coastal counties of the West of Ireland- Donegal, Leitrim, Sligo, Mayo, Galway, Clare, Limerick, Kerry and Cork.

This scenic drive of Ireland will take a while, and you might find that you end up pulling your car over every chance you get! So, here’s a list of some of the best places to visit along the Wild Atlantic Way….

Best Places To Visit Along The Wild Atlantic Way

1. Mizen Head

With dramatic sea cliffs and a location in the most southwesterly point of Ireland, it is home to a signal station that was built to save lives off the rocky shoreline.

Park your car and head down the path down to the famous 99 steps and over the arched bridge that looks down upon the gorge, this route will take you to the signal station. This path boasts stunning scenery you may even spot some seals, kittiwakes, gannets, choughs, minke, fin, and humpback whales!

Photo Via uma_sukhova

2. Skellig Michael

If you’re a Star Wars fan then you’ll definitely recognise this place! This unique island appears on Star Wars: The Last Jedi. It was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996.

This island was a place of pilgrimage all the way up until the 18th century… This mystic island holds the ruins of an ancient monastery, which date back to the 6th century. The Spanish Armada even have accounts from 1588 that indicate Skellig Michael was known to them.

If you don’t do the boat tour to the monastery, the best viewpoints of the island are; Coomanaspic Pass, St Finian’s Bay and The Kerry Cliffs.

3. Westport

Westport town is the ideal place to stop along the Wild Atlantic Way! You can easily spend a few nights in the town alone, soak up some traditional music and marvel at the architecture of this stunning 18th-century town.

Spend a day cycling the Great Western Greenway out to Achill Island, climb Croagh Patrick, and visit the islands at Clew Bay.

After an adventure-packed day, your evenings can be spent at one of their many traditional pubs. Plus, with great restaurants that boast some of the freshest and tastiest seafood, you’ll be spoiled for choice.

4. Cliffs of Moher

Stretching for 14 km and reaching a height. of 702ft, The Cliffs of Moher are an unmissable stop along The Wild Atlantic Way.

Along the cliff path, visitors can see the Aran Islands, the Maumturks and Twelve Pins mountain, and Loop Head. The cliffs rank among the most visited tourist sites in Ireland, with around 1.5 million visitors per year. It can get pretty windy up here, so be careful when taking any photographs near the edge!

5. Aran Islands

The Aran Islands are a group of three islands located at the mouth of Galway Bay. From west to east the islands are Inishmore, Inishmaan, and Inisheer.

The islands belong to the Gaeltacht and the 1,200 inhabitants primarily speak Irish. Visitors can either walk around them or cycle the pretty road that are lined with hand built brick walls. Enjoy fresh seafood and the simple things in life. The sheer cliffs looking out into the Atlantic ocean and the famous local hospitality make these a must visit for anybody who loves Ireland.

6. Killary Harbour

Killary Harbour is Ireland’s only true fjord located on the border between Galway and Mayo.

To the north lies the highest mountain in Connacht Mweelrea and to the south are the Twelve Bens and the Maumturk Mountains of Connemara. The surrounding area offers plenty of outdoor activities. You can enjoy everything from hillwalking to scuba diving and there are regular boat trips around the fjord.

Photo Via wildatlanticwaydiscoverysign

7. Sliabh Liag

Located in the southwest of Donegal are Ireland’s highest Sea Cliffs, Sliabh Liag. A visit to the cliffs and the surrounding region is a must on your Wild Atlantic Way adventure.

Sliabh Liag is a walker’s paradise and offers various trails for different skill levels. The famous One Man’s Pass loops around onto the Pilgrim’s Path and is not for the faint-hearted. If you decide to brave the One Man’s Pass you will reach the summit of the majestic cliffs. Here you can soak up amazing panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sligo Mountains, and Donegal Bay.

Photo Via eduganella

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Siobhan McKenny
Siobhan McKenny

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