How Long did it Take to Build Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel (CBBT) is a four-lane, 17.6-mile-long (28.3 km) bridge-tunnel structure that crosses the Chesapeake Bay in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The official name is the Lucius J. Kellam Jr. Bridge–Tunnel to commemorate one of the civic leaders who pushed for the structure’s development. Due to their similar names, this bridge is often confused with the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, which is located further up the estuary. Curious to learn more about this incredible feat of engineering? Then, read on. We’ll tell you how long it took to build the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel, as well as plenty of other interesting facts about its construction. 

How Long did it Take to Build Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

It took just 42 months to build the northbound section and 46 months to build the southbound section.

When was Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel built?

Workers started the construction of the northbound span of Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel on the 7th of September 1960 and opened to traffic on the 15th of April 1964. Construction began on the southbound span on the 16th of June 1995 and opened to traffic on the 19th of April 1999.

how long to build the chesapeake bay bridge-tunnel

Where is Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

The bridge is located in the U.S. state of Virginia. One end of the bridge is on the Virginia mainland at Virginia Beach near Norfolk and the other end is on Virginia’s Eastern Shore at Cape Charles.

What body of water does the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel span?

The bridge spans the Chesapeake Bay which is the largest estuary in the United States. The crossing is at the mouth of the bay where it meets the Atlantic Ocean.

What type of bridge is Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge is a complex of structures. It is a low trestle style bridge with tunnels. The complex has 12 miles of low-level trestle bridge, two one-mile-long tunnels, two high bridges, two miles of causeway, and four man-made islands.

Who built Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

The engineering firm Sverdrup & Parcel designed the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel.

What is Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel made of?

Workers constructed the bridge out of steel and concrete.

how long to build the chesapeake bay bridge-tunnel

How long is Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

The length is 17.6 miles (28.3km) long from shore to shore. The overall length is 23 miles (37km) and it is 20 miles (32km) from one toll plaza to the next toll plaza.

How many people died building Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

Seven workers died during the construction of the bridge.

How much did it cost to build Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

It cost $200 million to build the northbound section in 1964 and $250 million to build the southbound section in 1999. By comparison, it cost $45 million to build the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in 1952. It cost $15 million to build the Brooklyn Bridge which opened in 1883, it cost roughly $60 million to build the George Washington Bridge which opened in 1931 and it cost $35 million to build the Golden Gate Bridge, which opened in 1937. 

Why was a second Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel built?

Officials decided to build the second (southbound) section to meet “future traffic demands and provide for a safer crossing” of Chesapeake Bay.

How many vehicles use the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel?

As of January, the CBBT has had more than 140 million vehicle crossings. About 4 million vehicles use the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel each year.

What awards has the bridge won?

In 1965, the American Society of Civil Engineers recognised the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel as one of the “Seven Engineering Wonders of the Modern World” and also gave the bridge an Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement award.

Melanie May

Melanie is an intrepid solo traveller, endlessly curious about people, places and food. She is a fan of slow travel and loves exploring the world by mouth, discovering a culture through its food. Having backpacked her way around the world she turned her wanderlust into a career and is now a full-time travel writer.

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